Your success and the role of mentors

simon chaplinI’ve just had the most amazing call with my business mentor, Simon Chaplin (www.SocksUpSimon.com) – but then every call with him is like that at some level.

I don’t know about you, but now that the Olympics and my holidays are over, I’ve been feeling a little bit lost: directionless, unmotivated, wondering if I’m going in the right direction, worried about business cashflow, and a whole load more – all very low energy thoughts and emotions. All that changed after my call with Simon this morning.

It doesn’t matter how good you are at something, and I know I’m very good at helping people have a higher level of Emotional Intelligence, we all need outside input from other people to help us get a sense of perspective and help us clarify our thinking – right now I have mentors/coaches to help me with my business, my diet and nutrition, and my physical health. I’m fortunate that I learned early on to surround myself with great coaches and mentors in different fields. After all, if Usain Bolt, Jessica Ennis, Mo Farah, and a whole host of other Olympians/ Para-olympians have coaches and mentors, don’t we ordinary mortals need them even more? If the best in the field can perform even better with the help of their coaches/mentors, then how much can you improve what you do with the right people helping you? The right people helping you are worth far more than the fee you may exchange with them for their expertise.

I call my team of experts my Power Team, because they help me become more powerful at what I do.

Who are the people in your Power Team? Do you have any at all? If not, how much are you being held back in business and in life because you only learn from your own mistakes? A Power Team of experts around you will save you years of struggle, disappointment and despair. How many years do you have to waste? If you don’t have anyone yet and are thinking ‘I can’t afford to have one’, my question is can you really afford NOT to have one? You don’t need to have a team right off the bat, just start with one as I did, it really is so much better than none.

People often wonder what the difference is between a coach and a mentor. There are official definitions, I prefer this informal one: a coach is someone who has the skills to help you become better at what you do but not necessarily have excelled at that thing themselves; a mentor is someone who has already achieved what you want to achieve and can guide you from personal experience.

So why would someone have a coach if the coach hasn’t already done what they are helping you to do? Let’s use one of the athletes as an example:

Usain Bolt has several coaches, for the physical aspect of sprinting and for the mental aspect as well. They help him with technique and strategy. They haven’t broken the 100m world record themselves, but they can still help him, as they have proven. Usain is at the top of his field, but he could have someone as a mentor who has broken a world record in another athletics discipline. In the case of Yohan Blake, silver medallist in the Olympic 100m final, he could have Usain Bolt as his mentor because Usain has ‘been there and done it’.

I personally believe both a coach and a mentor have a role to play in your success. Who will you start with in your Power Team?

If you would like to explore how I may help you, contact me through the website at http://sanjayshah.tv/contact-us/ .

 

Go on, build a team.

 

PS. My next Emotional Power Live course is on Saturday 29 September in Birmingham. www.sanjayshah.tv/events . The first 10 tickets are available at a 50% discount, so hurry and book before you miss out on those!

Are you a medal winner or someone who takes part just to be counted?

2012-olympic-medals-all3As the London 2012 Olympics draws to an end, Team GB have won more Gold Medals than at any other Olympics for over 100 years.

There was great jubilation, and also the occasional disappointment, amongst all the athletes going for gold for Team GB. There were tears of happiness, of finally seeing a dream come true: and there were tears of disappointment, of seeing a dream shattered.

There were many reasons that the athletes had for competing. At the top of the tree, the medal winners:
On Thursday evening, there was Usain Bolt, achieving the double of successfully defending both his 100m and 200m victories from the Beijing 2008 Olympics. He did it, in his own words, to be a ‘legend’.
An hour before that, almost forgotten by the time of Usain Bolt’s triumph, was the great victory of David Rudisha. In the process of winning the Gold Medal, he also broke the 800m World Record and led EVERY other runner in that final to set either a personal best or a national record for the country they represented. It was described by many as the best 800m race ever run. Patrick Rudisha did it to make his father (an athlete in the 1968 Olympics), and Sebastian Coe (who had encouraged him in his endeavour) proud.
Two great athletes, two very different reasons for competing to win.

Then, at the other end of the scale were the athletes, who had no chance of winning a medal.
Wojdan Shaherkani  took part in the women’s Judo event, whilst her compatriot, Sarah Attar, took part in the women’s 800m race. Wojdan Shaherkani  lasted about a minute in her one and only bout in Judo, whilst Sarah Attar came last in her race. Neither stood a chance of winning a medal or competed to win, but just to take part – they were the first women ever allowed by Saudi Arabia to compete in the Olympics. They both endured (and continue to endure) severe criticism from many people within their own country just for taking part.

Who are the greater Olympians, the ‘winners’ or the ‘losers’. Both, for different reasons, all of which are valid. Why do you take part in the Olympics of life? Do you take part to become a legend, for pride, for the right to compete, or for another equally worthy reason?

I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true.
I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have.
I must stand with anybody that stands right, and part with him when he goes wrong.

Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President

Whatever your reason, you are worthy.

Go on, it’s never too late to win.